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No one would have dared predict, not that long ago when the Chinese were still mixing coca-cola with their grands crus wines, that the people's Republic would have become a superpower of the wine.

The Chinese thirst for red wine seems to know no limit, as the consumption of white and sparkling is catching up.

Dethroning France, China has become the first consumer of red wine in the world, according to studies conducted by Vinexpo. Between 2007 and 2013, consumption in China was multiplied by 2.75 (+ 175.4%) while during the same period it decreased by 5.8% in Italy and 18% in France.

As wages and living standards improve, the Chinese middle class, with its 400 million people, is increasingly attracted to Western consumer products. "Here, the wine market has great potential, and it is very lucky for France,” said Wu Jianmin, former ambassador to Paris. “When the Chinese started drinking French wine, it was a luxury product. But it is now within reach of middle-class wallets.”

Fifth Producer of Wine in the World

 

French wines still dominate nearly 50% of the Chinese market, well ahead of Australia, Italy and Spain and the people's Republic remains especially the first importer of Bordeaux. "In China, wine, which is very expensive, is consumed mostly by an urban class," believes Boris Petric, anthropologist at CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique). “The culture of the gift is still very important and wine gifts sometimes ends up on a shelf, as a status symbol. We should not confuse consumption and sale. However, the percentage of wine connoisseurs is climbing and wine bars are thriving. "
China has also become in the past few years the fifth producer of wines in the world behind Italy, France, the United States and Spain. More than 80% of consumed wines in China are made there. Attracted by the potential of the Chinese market, French groups are investing in the People's Republic. The Chinese Government encourages investments that aim to develop poor or semi-desert areas through viticulture, such as Ningxia, the new Eldorado of Chinese wine, or Xinjiang. China has decided to be a great producer and will be both in surface and volume the first wine producing country in the world within the next 5 years.

French wines still dominate nearly 50% of the Chinese market, well ahead of Australia, Italy and Spain and the people's Republic remains especially the first importer of Bordeaux. "In China, wine, which is very expensive, is consumed mostly by an urban class," believes Boris Petric, anthropologist at CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique). “The culture of the gift is still very important and wine gifts sometimes ends up on a shelf, as a status symbol. We should not confuse consumption and sale. However, the percentage of wine connoisseurs is climbing and wine bars are thriving. "


China has also become in the past few years the fifth producer of wines in the world behind Italy, France, the United States and Spain. More than 80% of consumed wines in China are made there. Attracted by the potential of the Chinese market, French groups are investing in the People's Republic. The Chinese Government encourages investments that aim to develop poor or semi-desert areas through viticulture, such as Ningxia, the new Eldorado of Chinese wine, or Xinjiang. China has decided to be a great producer and will be both in surface and volume the first wine producing country in the world within the next 5 years.

This is certainly unsettling for its European partners.

As a result, Beijing has opened an investigation in July to determine if the European Union subsidizes its exports of wine to China, thus creating a distortion of competition. The initiative has been interpreted as a measure of retaliation for the decision made in Brussels to impose punitive customs duties on solar panels made in China... But they are also a sign of the new wine-growing ambitions of the Red Republic.

For more information go to : http://avis-vin.lefigaro.fr/magazine-vin/o110436-la-chine-future-superpuissance-vitivinicole#xtor=EPR-178#ixzz2sYgHesV4