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Mark Schatzker: The Dorito Effect; The Surprising Truth about Food and Flavor

 
Mangoes have dazzled palates across the globe for centuries with their aroma, taste, texture, and seemingly endless shapes, sizes, and colors. In Miami alone there are over 250 varieties. Miami-based writer, critic, poet and educator Jen Karetnick is the award-winning author of nine books, including three this year alone: the recently published book Mango and two volumes  Prayer of Confession and Brie Season about to be released.
Jen’s nickname, Mango Mama, could not be more appropriate! Jen lives on the last acre of a historic mango plantation with her husband, two children; three dogs; four cats; and fourteen mango trees!  By the time July comes around, Jen uses mangoes in the most unexpected ways, in just about everything, cocktails, smoothies, savory and sweet dishes.
Along with her own recipes which she has developed over the years, the book Mango features recipes from a group of Jen’s buddies who happen to be Miami's most celebrated chefs.
From smoothies to cocktails, from mango blintzes to jerked grouper with mango-fig chutney, and mangozpacho (mango-infused gazpacho)--this book is  the ultimate book on Mango. It is delightfully written, based on serious research and highlights  all those chefs and mixologists who are striving to use our local products in their cuisines.
Click here for Jen’s recipe for frozen mango sangría, or “Mangría,” 

 

For decades we've watched obesity go from crisis to chronic disease affecting one third of America’s population. First, we assumed it was fat that was the problem, then it was carbs, then it was sugar, now it's gluten. But what if it isn't really any of the above? What if the culprit is so elusive that nobody thinks of even denouncing it?

According to Mark Schatzker, Americans add nearly 600 million pounds of flavorings to food each year, everything from syrups to spices and sauces for humans and palatants for animal feed which could be fueling America’s and the world’s obesity epidemic.

This new book is taking a bite out of the food industry. In "The Dorito Effect--The Surprising New Truth About Food and Flavor,” award-winning Canadian journalist Mark Schatzker argues that the food industry has expertly learned to manipulate flavor to make their products irresistible, while fruits, vegetables and meat have all become incrementally less delicious.  

“We’re all after deliciousness but we’re misdirecting our palates.  Everything is getting blander and simultaneously more seasoned. Everything is becoming like a Dorito.”

“We have taken great leaps forward in technology, allowing us to produce in the lab the very flavors that are being lost on the farm. Thanks to this largely invisible epidemic, seemingly healthy food is becoming more like junk food: highly craveable but nutritionally empty,” says author Mark Schatzker.  

mark schatzkerIn the well-written and fascinating “The Dorito Effect, the Surprising New Thruth About Food and Flavor” Mark Schatzker takes a look at the mysterious chemicals that make food delicious and bad for us; how artificial flavorings trick both the human and animal minds into nutritionally empty foods; at why chicken and other foods taste like “a roll of wet toilet paper” and why do consumers put up with the fact that modern food is the most compelling lie humans have ever told.

Listen as Mark Schatzker answers questions such as:  “Are we fooling people with package labelling using words that sound healthy like "natural"?”, “What can consumers do to bring around change?”

With in-depth historical and scientific research, The Dorito Effect casts the food crisis in a new light, weaving an enthralling tale of how we got to this point and where we are headed.  

Based on serious research backed by an extensive knowledge of history, chemistry and genetic engineering, the book reads like a thriller. It is an eye opener for anyone priding him/herself on being an independent human being.

 

From more information log on the book and author, log on to  www.markschatzker.com